These forums are archived!
Please create a new account at our new forums here: http://forum.modifiedpowerwheels.com
ModifiedPowerWheels.com powerwheels upgrades, peg-perego and others very welcome

Specializing in Peg Perego and Power Wheels Parts and Machines
Home | My Files | Profile | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ | RSS allows you to view new posts anywhere!!
 All Forums
 General Discussion
 General Discussion
 metal plate for sag fix
 Forum Locked
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

jacwood
New Member

Concord
NC

12 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  11:47:09  Show Profile
does anyone have the dimensions of the steel plates for the sag fix .I have someone that can cut them but needs the measurements.
Plus its been to cold to go out and take the truck apart to measure
thanks
Chris

treebeme
Advanced Modder

Holtsville
NY
USA



3209 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  12:37:56  Show Profile
I did a simplier fix to the front end of my unibody jeep this weekend. I'll post the pics tonight. All you need is two hitch pins, two fender washers and a small piece of metal stock (either flat or angle-iron). Plus 4 bolts, lock washers and nuts.

Basically, I expanded the hole inward on one side of the stock cross-member so it looked more like a slot. I cut a couple of 6 inch long aluminum plates and drilled out a 7/16" inch hole at the end of each of them. I then bolted those plates to the stock cross-member so that the axles go through the aluminum plates and the stock-cross-member. I lined up those plates so that in effect I made the cross-member holes an 1/8" closer together than stock.

I then drilled a hole in the end of the axle so I can hold it back in place with a hitch pin. When assembled I have the axle going through the black plastic steering arm, then through a big fender washer, then through the new plate, then through the cross-member, then through the plastic hole in the unibody, then through another washer and the hitch pin goes through the axle to hold it in place. For the top washer by the hitch pin I used the stock washer that used to be between the black plastic steering arm and the cross-member.

This improved the steering in many ways. By having the holes in the plates being exactly 7/16" inch and slightly away from the plastic unibody holes (original cross-member between them) that got rid of all the play in that part of the mount.

By having the two axle mount holes on the cross member being 1/8" closer together between the two sides of the vehicles it fixed the toe-out problem because the steering bar was now longer in relation to the plastic steering arms than where they mount to the cross member which in effect made both wheels turn inwards a little. This also caused a slight difference in the angle of the axles through the plastic unibody holes which improved the camber (sag) a little.

The fender washers further improved the camber (sag) because now the black plastic steering arms sat flush against the plate (via the washer) attached to the crossmember where before the original washer between the two allowed the arms to angle upwards slightly.

To further fix play and camber I wrapped the horizontal part of the axles with a small plastic bag before seating it in the steering arm. This way it fit snugger in the slot and it may have helped angle it downwards even more.

I know this may sound a bit complicated but it really wasn't. Hopefully it will make more sense with the pictures I will post tonight. In simpliest terms I drilled a bunch of holes, mounted a couple of plates to the stock cross-member using four bolts and shoved it back together. I didn't have to bend anything like some of the other suggested fixes require.

Edited by - treebeme on 02/20/2007 12:45:22
Go to Top of Page

TiddlerRacer
Senior Modder

Adrian
MI
USA



1849 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  13:05:59  Show Profile
treebeme - sounds like a good fix but it does not fix any alignment issues that may be present. I know every PW we've had has had a serious "toe out" issue, and Jamesonsdad's alignment technique of bending the axles is the simpliest fix for that.

When I fixed the sag on our unibody Jeep I used a set up similar to yours, but I ran a single piece of angle iron across the entire bottom of the front module. I then used the original bottom support, cut the ends off, relocated the smaller (approximately 4") pieces to the top of the module and sandwiched it all together with bolts. Very stout!

****Testing the limits of Fisher Price engineering on a daily basis.****
Go to Top of Page

jacwood
New Member

Concord
NC

12 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  13:44:35  Show Profile
sounds like some great mods
I guess I just need to look at which one I want to try
cant wait for some pics

thanks
Go to Top of Page

treebeme
Advanced Modder

Holtsville
NY
USA



3209 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  13:52:08  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by TiddlerRacer

treebeme - sounds like a good fix but it does not fix any alignment issues that may be present. I know every PW we've had has had a serious "toe out" issue, and Jamesonsdad's alignment technique of bending the axles is the simpliest fix for that.

When I fixed the sag on our unibody Jeep I used a set up similar to yours, but I ran a single piece of angle iron across the entire bottom of the front module. I then used the original bottom support, cut the ends off, relocated the smaller (approximately 4") pieces to the top of the module and sandwiched it all together with bolts. Very stout!

****Testing the limits of Fisher Price engineering on a daily basis.****



No, the toe gets fixed just fine.



If you shorten the cross-member as I explained (A) and the steering bar (b) stays the same length, the wheels get turned, thus fixing the toe. I'll download the pictures in about an hour. This fixed a pretty severe problem with toe out.

Edited by - treebeme on 02/20/2007 13:52:42
Go to Top of Page

TiddlerRacer
Senior Modder

Adrian
MI
USA



1849 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  16:10:22  Show Profile
Doh...read right over that, sorry!

****Testing the limits of Fisher Price engineering on a daily basis.****
Go to Top of Page

treebeme
Advanced Modder

Holtsville
NY
USA



3209 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  17:31:36  Show Profile
Here is the plate against the cross-member showing how much I expanded the original hole to make it into a slot. I just drilled two holes in the plate and cross-member in order to bolt them together. I did have to notch the plastic on the jeep where the bolts lined up.



Here is the completed cross-member. There was really no great reason I used angled aluminum verses a flat piece except that I happen to have angled aluminum in my garage.



Edited by - treebeme on 02/20/2007 17:36:07
Go to Top of Page

treebeme
Advanced Modder

Holtsville
NY
USA



3209 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  17:33:05  Show Profile
Here is the unit bolted on to the jeep. Basically I put the original washer on top by the hitch pin and put in a big washer between the black plastic steering arm and the new plate over the cross member. I had to shave the plastic on the very end to make the original cross member press against the plastic as tight as possible in order to shove the axle through far enough for me to get the hitch pin on. Make sure you drill the hitch pin hole near the end of the axle or you will never get it back on.



And another angle.


Edited by - treebeme on 02/20/2007 17:35:01
Go to Top of Page

treebeme
Advanced Modder

Holtsville
NY
USA



3209 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2007 :  17:39:16  Show Profile
Here is the jeep with the wheels back on (with the larger silverado tires).

Go to Top of Page

jacwood
New Member

Concord
NC

12 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2007 :  05:45:22  Show Profile
thanks for the pics now I have an idea on what to do
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 Forum Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
 Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05